Princeview Dental Weighs in on Recent Study Linking Poor Oral Health to Overall Health Concerns

Etobicoke, Canada, September 18, 2015 – Princeview Dental (www.PrinceviewDental.com), a premier dental clinic in Etobicoke, is weighing in on a recent study that reveals how oral health impacts an individual’s overall health.

Published in the British Medical Journal, the study found that oral hygiene doesn’t just affect one’s teeth; if an individual doesn’t practice good oral health care, they may be at risk for a variety of health concerns, including heart disease, cancer, arthritis, and various inflammatory diseases. (Source: Hermiston, N., “Dental care important for general health,” Magnet web site, July 16, 2015; http://www.edenmagnet.com.au/story/2342435/dental-care-important-for-general-health/?cs=4090.)

“If a patient has poor oral health, he or she may develop periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory oral diseases,” says Dr. Janice Mummery, a Toronto dentist and founder of Princeview Dental. “According to this study’s findings, not brushing and flossing daily and skipping regular visits with the dentist can certainly lead to a variety of health problems, in addition to tooth decay and gum disease.”

As Dr. Mummery notes, according to the study’s findings, there is a link between poor oral health and poor overall health. If a patient suffers from periodontitis, bacteria can become embedded under the gums, which in turn can lead to tooth decay and loss. But that bacteria can also enter the blood stream, leading to further health issues throughout the body. (Source: Ibid.)

“Because these health concerns can take some time to develop, they’re usually only found in adults,” Dr. Mummery continues. “However, one of the easiest ways to predict a patient’s risk for gum disease is poor oral hygiene at a young age. Ensuring children understand the importance of dental health at a young age can help prevent general health concerns into adulthood.”

Many dentists note that one of the fastest ways to spot gingivitis is bleeding gums when brushing. If detected early through a dental check-up, which should be scheduled every six to eight months according to Dr. Mummery’s recommendations, gingivitis can be treated easily. It can also be prevented through regular flossing, thorough brushing, and consistent check-ups.

“The findings of this study only serve to reinforce what dentists have been telling patients for years—that practicing good oral hygiene is not only good for their teeth, but for the rest of their body as well,” concludes Dr. Mummery. “For adults, it’s never too late to start practicing good oral hygiene. Booking an appointment with a dentist who can help an individual determine the weak points in their oral hygiene routine is a good start and a sure way to set the body on a path to better health.”

Princeview Dental is currently welcoming new patients. To book an appointment or for more oral health care advice, visit their offices on the Kingsway in Toronto or see the company’s web site at http://www.princeviewdental.com.

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